Subheading

Decarbonising
Shipping

CHEK is a European Union’s Horizon2020 funded project that proposes to reach zero emission shipping by disrupting the way ships are designed and operated today.

About Chek
The project will develop and demonstrate two bespoke vessel designs – a wind energy optimised bulk carrier and a hydrogen powered cruise ship – equipped with an interdisciplinary combination of innovative technologies working in symbiosis to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 99% and achieve at least 50% energy savings.

Rather than “stacking” novel technologies onto existing vessel designs, the consortium is proposing to develop a unique Future-Proof Vessel (FPV) Design Platform to ensure maximised symbiosis between the novel technologies proposed and taking into consideration the vessels’ real operational profiles, rather than just sea-trial performance. The FPV Platform will also serve as a basis for replicating the CHEK approach towards other vessel types such as tankers, container ships, general
cargo ships and ferries. These jointly cover over 93% of the global shipping tonnage and are responsible for 85% of global GHG emissions from shipping.

In order to achieve real-world impact and the decarbonisation of the global shipping fleet, CHEK will analyse framework conditions influencing long-distance shipping today, including infrastructure availability, legislation and business models and propose solutions to ensure the proposed vessel designs can and will be deployed in reality.

A Foresight Exercise will simulate the deployment of the CHEK innovations on the global shipping fleet with the aim of reaching the IMO’s goal of halving shipping emissions by 2050 and contributing to turning Europe into the first carbon-neutral continent by 2050, as stipulated by the European Green Deal.
Results

Future Proof Vessel (FPV) design platform

CHEK will develop a digital Future Proof Vessel (FPV) design platform and demonstrate decarbonisation by technologies operating in symbiosis. The demonstrations will be performed on a cruise ship and a bulk carrier

Air lubrication

Hull air lubrication will be used to reduce the resistance of the vessels by reducing the frictional resistance on the flat bottom of the hull. This will be investigated over various operating conditions and speeds, and will need to be able to work in symbiosis with other decarbonisation technologies such as wind propulsion and will work in symbiosis with the engines to seek positive gains in energy efficiency.

Automated route optimization

Route optimisation can lead to significant fuel savings, and involves the consideration of weather and sea state ship operating conditions and logistics.

Battery / Hybrid energy

Battery and hybrid electric energy systems will be integrated with the hydrogen engine, waste heat recovery and

Gate rudder

Gate rudders have the potential to significantly reduce ship resistance if integrated with an optimised hull shape. Their ability to be integrated with other systems such as wind propulsion systems is essential.

Ultrasound anti-fouling

Ultrasound anti-fouling technology will be used to keep the hull clean by preventing the formation of biofilm and thereby minimise drag in the long-term.

Waste heat recovery

Waste-heat recovery will be used to maximise the conversion of fuel into useful power by converting waste heat from the engine process, which is low-temperature heat into useful electricity.

Wind Sails

Wind sails will be used to provide direct thrust from renewable energy for the CHEK bulk carrier.Wind-assisted propulsion is expected to provide a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but continuous power for the vessel requires its integration with other technologies.

Air lubrication

Hull air lubrication will be used to reduce the resistance of the vessels by reducing the frictional resistance on the flat bottom of the hull. This will be investigated over various operating conditions and speeds, and will need to be able to work in symbiosis with other decarbonisation technologies such as wind propulsion and will work in symbiosis with the engines to seek positive gains in energy efficiency.

Automated route optimization

Route optimisation can lead to significant fuel savings, and involves the consideration of weather and sea state ship operating conditions and logistics.

Battery / Hybrid energy

Battery and hybrid electric energy systems will be integrated with the hydrogen engine, waste heat recovery and

Gate rudder

Gate rudders have the potential to significantly reduce ship resistance if integrated with an optimised hull shape. Their ability to be integrated with other systems such as wind propulsion systems is essential.

H2 hydrogen

The cruise ship will be powered by a hydrogen engine in combination with a hybrid-electric power plant and waste-heat recovery. Hydrogen fuel will be used to provide continuous carbon-free power, electricity and heat on demand.

Ultrasound anti-fouling

Ultrasound anti-fouling technology will be used to keep the hull clean by preventing the formation of biofilm and thereby minimise drag in the long-term.

Waste heat recovery

Waste-heat recovery will be used to maximise the conversion of fuel into useful power by converting waste heat from the engine process, which is low-temperature heat into useful electricity.

Waste-to-energy

Waste-to-power systems will be integrated to efficiently convert waste products into useful energy.

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